What documents do I need when entering the U.S. on an E3 visa?

No matter how confident you are, there’s going to be a brief moment when your plane touches down back in the U.S. where you think to yourself “I sure hope this goes smoothly”. Well… it does for me. I know I’m legally allowed to re-enter the country as many times as I want, I know I’ve got my valid E3 visa, I know I’ve done nothing wrong, but I still question whether I’ve got the right documents.

You technically only need your approved and valid (date) E3 visa sticker, stuck in your valid passport.

With those documents, you should be able to say to the agent at the gate that you’re back to work as per your visa, and you will stroll right in.

In my personal experience, this has happened almost every time with one or two questions around:

  • What do you do for work?
  • What is the company’s name?
  • What is your role detailed on your visa? and
  • Where have you been and what have you been doing?

An honest reply to each and every one of these has resulted in a stamp, stamp, stamp, and I’m on my way.

But just to be careful I recommend traveling with a few extra documents where you can. These aren’t required in most cases but carrying a few pieces of paper has absolutely no impact on your carry-on weight and will give you the peace of mind:

  1. Your approved LCA – Sure, it’s a stack of pages and a bit of a pain in the ass to carry around, but it shows preparedness and proof all in one
  2. Recent payslips – An easy way to show that you are still gainfully employed is to show that you’re still being paid. Print a couple of months of payslips out and you’ll be ready to whip them out if any questions arise
  3. Bank statements – To line up with your payslips
  4. (Especially if it’s a long trip away) A letter from your employer – This letter can simply state (on letterhead) that you’re all good for the period you’re away from the business and it is known to them
  5. (At a stretch) Any proof you have of ties to your home country – Showing that you’re still attached to your home country and don’t plan to move is always a great option (e.g. Bank statements from Australia, proof of property ownership etc.)